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Library of Virginia

Peace activist Marii Kyogoku Hasegawa and government official Kay Coles James are among this year's Virginia Women in History honorees. more

News

The Library of Virginia seeks public input about the subjects of its upcoming exhibition featuring African-American participants in World War I. more

Galleries

Your guide to what's good for the week ahead more

New restaurant announcements, an incubation kitchen and thoughtful films mark the news this week. more

Food News & Trends

Public and college libraries protect troves of rarities. more

Arts

This Independence Day, historian Jon Kukla reassesses the firebrand from Hanover County in a new biography. more

Arts

Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney announced a commission tasked with correcting what he terms a false narrative concerning the city's Confederate statues. more

News 1 Comments

Martha Rollins, a Richmond activist, retired businesswoman and founder of the nonprofit Boaz & Ruth, is among eight Virginia Women in History being recognized by the Library of Virginia this month. more

News

A state revenue shortfall hits hard at the Library of Virginia. more

News

Put down your cellphone, lace up your walking shoes and grab your library card. The trails are waiting. more

Recreation

Richmond wanted change — but not so much more

History

Back in November 1999, Richmond magazine put together a collection of essays for its "100 Years of Richmond" as an acknowledgment of the 20th century's end. Earl Hamner Jr. wrote a little something for us. more

Arts

For Richmond’s art spaces, necessity is the mother of innovation more

Arts 1 Comments

The roots and rise of gospel music in Richmond more

Features 2 Comments

Nathan Vernon Madison started out researching text for interpretive signs at the Tredegar Iron Works site. What he found was a rich history of men and machines pitted against nature, war, economic vagaries and the bonds of families. more

Arts

Reconstruction in Richmond advanced political and educational changes for blacks through the 1890s, but many of those gains evaporated as the federal government looked the other way more

Features

Emancipation was not a magic wand. Enormous resistance greeted the incorporation of African-Americans into the national structure — in particular, its educational system. A new exhibit at the Library of Virginia explores this period in history. more

Arts

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Library of Congress archives

A preview events around town that guide us through the seminal moments of the war’s conclusion — exploring our shared history and what it means to us as Richmonders and as a nation. more

Features

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